Shakshuka Recipe

5 from 1 vote
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Shakshuka Recipe

Tired of the same old breakfast routine? Craving something more exotic, and bursting with flavor? Look no further than traditional Shakshuka.

Shakshuka is a popular and flavorful dish that originates from North Africa and the Middle East. It consists of eggs poached in a rich and spiced tomato sauce, often served with crusty bread for dipping. The name “shakshuka” is derived from the Arabic word “shakshek,” which means “to mix” or “to shake,” referring to the combination of ingredients in the dish.

I would best describe Shakshuka as runny poached eggs served over fresh homemade warm salsa—except it’s 1000 times better. It nearly contains all the same ingredients as salsa. Diced pepper and onions, whole peeled canned tomatoes (I use Plum or Roma tomatoes), spices, garlic, and olive oil. It’s easy to make, perfect for breakfast or brunch, and comes together in about 25 minutes.

Nestling eggs into a bubbling hot skillet is a great way to present your dish. Try eggs over a sweet potato hash or the ever present classic corned beef hash. It’s no secret why breakfast skillets are a diner favorite.

How to Make Shakshuka

The traditional base of shakshuka is made by sautéing onions, bell peppers, and garlic in olive oil until softened. A medley of spices such as cumin, paprika, and sometimes cayenne pepper are then added to create a robust flavor profile. Crushed or diced tomatoes are incorporated, and the sauce is allowed to simmer to develop its rich consistency and meld the flavors together.

Once the tomato sauce is ready, small wells are created in the sauce, and eggs are cracked into each well. The skillet is then covered and the eggs are gently poached in the simmering sauce until the whites are set but the yolks remain slightly runny.

Shakshuka Recipe

Tips for Making Shakshuka

  • While you can use fresh Roma tomatoes for Shakshuka, they aren’t always accessible and it can take a long time to cook and reduce. I always opt for whole peeled canned tomatoes and chop them with the tip of a spatula as they cook.
  • Shakshuka calls for sweet paprika, which is sweeter and more flavorful than regular paprika. The best substitutes are cayenne pepper and crushed red pepper flakes. You can also use smoked Hungarian paprika. Worst case, regular paprika or even chili powder is fine.
  • You can make this recipe in a saute pan or cast iron skillet, ideally with a lid so you can steam-poach the eggs on the stovetop. You can alternatively place the skillet in the oven (assuming it is oven-safe), to fully cook the eggs with very similar results.
  • Feta and cilantro are optional ingredients, but I personally love the flavor and texture they both contribute. Feta is very mild and adds creaminess as it melts.

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5 from 1 vote

Shakshuka Recipe

Servings: 4
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 15 minutes
Total: 25 minutes
Shakshuka is a delicious Maghrebi dish comprised of simmered chopped tomatoes with spices, peppers, and onions topped with baked runny eggs, feta, and fresh cilantro.

Ingredients 

  • 4-6 eggs
  • 28- ounce can whole peeled plum or Roma tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored and diced
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika *see note*
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon sriracha, or more to taste
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup feta cheese
  • Toasted French or Italian bread for serving

Instructions 

  • Bring oil to medium heat in a 10-12 inch lidded saute pan or cast iron skillet. Add pepper and onion and season with salt and pepper. Cook until onions are translucent and tender, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add tomatoes with juices, cumin, sweet paprika, and sriracha. Use the tip of a spatula to break the tomatoes into small chunks. You can also chop prior to adding to the skillet. Let simmer for about 10-15 minutes until slightly reduced and thickened. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  • Create small wells for the eggs using the back of a spoon. Gently crack the eggs into the wells, keeping the yolks intact.
  • Continue to gently simmer covered for about 5 minutes or until the egg whites are no longer translucent. Yolks should still be runny. Alternatively, bake uncovered for 5-7 minutes at 375°F. Let rest for 5 minutes before serving.
  • Top with chopped cilantro and feta and serve with toasted French or Italian bread drizzled with olive oil.

Notes

While you can use fresh Roma tomatoes for Shakshuka, they aren’t always accessible and it can take a long time to cook and reduce. I always opt for whole peeled canned tomatoes and chop them with the tip of a spatula as they cook.
Shakshuka calls for sweet paprika, which is sweeter and more flavorful than regular paprika. The best substitutes are cayenne pepper and crushed red pepper flakes. You can also use smoked Hungarian paprika. Worst case, regular paprika or even chili powder is fine.
You can make this recipe in a saute pan or cast iron skillet, ideally with a lid so you can steam-poach the eggs on the stovetop. You can alternatively place the skillet in the oven (assuming it is oven-safe), to fully cook the eggs with very similar results.
Feta and cilantro are optional ingredients, but I personally love the flavor and texture they both contribute. Feta is very mild and adds creaminess as it melts.

Nutrition

Serving: 1(without bread)Calories: 215kcalCarbohydrates: 14.5gProtein: 9.4gFat: 13.7gSaturated Fat: 3.8gCholesterol: 172mgSodium: 711mgFiber: 2.8gSugar: 8.1g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mediterranean
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About Shawn Williams

My name is Shawn, author behind Kitchen Swagger. I'm a food & drink enthusiast bringing you my own simple and delicious restaurant-inspired recipes.

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